DEAR MARILYN, LOVE ANDY

CLEARLY MARILYN

Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marily Green Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Green Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Blue Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Blue Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Red Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marily Green Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Green Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Blue Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Blue Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Diagonal Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Kristin Pavlick.JPG
Clear Acrylic Marilyn Orange Shadow Kristin Pavlick.JPG

CLEARLY MARILYN

600.00

Less is More.

Celebrate Marilyn's iconic legacy with CLEARLY MARILYN-- An effortless balance of essential details, bold color choice, and thoughtful shape placement. This series is sure to become a mainstay in your home. Spray Painted on clear acrylic,  these four works are ready to stand alone or as a collection!

  • Dimensions: 30" (h) x 24" (w) x .25" (d)
  • Metric Dimensions: 76.2 cm (h) x 60.96 cm (w) x .635 cm (d)
  • Materials: Spray Paint on Acrylic 
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INSPIRATIONS + OBSERVATIONS

CLEARLY MARILYN, was an exciting group of paintings to create for a combination of reasons. There was a new process,  new materials, and I was able to fulfill a conceptual meaning all at the same time. Moreover, my painting process is forever looking for ways to incorporate printmaking-- fascinated with printmaking's laborious techniques, its requirements of layers, its mastery use of shapes, etc.  Your first assumption may lead you to blame Andy Warhol for this, but it was a printmaking course that -- quite possibly-- rewired my brain forever.  

Conceptually, repetition is a major theme throughout this series. Inundated by visual culture's imagery, I ask if we take enough of a critical view of these images. Seemingly harmless, but what are the implications of these images? How do they influence our meaning-making process? Do they influence out decision making? And just how do these silent, persistent imageries sneak by our analytical selves? Perhaps, repetition is the avenue that leads right into our subconscious.